California Palm Trees

Where to go when Texas gets cold? California!

We settled in and reconnoitered the place as we drove around the desert. Traveling in the Thousand Palms Canyon of the Coachella Valley, we found the most delightful haven—the Thousand Palms Oasis.

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Thousand Palms Oasis

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Thousand Palms Oasis

Everything is silent in the oasis and you can immerse yourself in the beauty and solitude of the magnificent palm trees. 

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Thousand Palms Oasis

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Thousand Palms Oasis

Stepping into this sanctuary, I was startled by the unexpected lushness of the palms. I absorbed the feathery fronds and admired the stately trunks soaring 60 feet high.

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Thousand Palms Oasis

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Thousand Palms Oasis

Like all palms, the Washingtonia filifera, isn’t actually a tree at all, but is related to grasses and bamboos. Rather than sprouting growth rings, a palm is basically a column that sucks water from the roots to its sprouting crown via a series of drinking-strawlike tubes. The palm trees of this oasis feed on water from the San Andreas Fault line. 

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Thousand Palms Oasis, the skirt of dried leaves hanging down the trunk of the native California fan palm is more than a fashion statement; it’s a home to animals who help the palm propagate

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Thousand Palms Oasis, the skirt of dried leaves hanging down the trunk of the native California fan palm is more than a fashion statement; it’s a home to animals who help the palm propagate

To experience the magnificence of the Preserve, one can trek a two-mile round trip that takes you through a palm oasis, across the fault zone, through a desert wash to the McCallum Oasis, one of the largest groves of desert fan palms in California. 

We were enjoying the trek, our boots filling up with desert sand. I stepped on a tiny rock twisted my ankle and my face hit the ground. Argh!

Remember the two-mile round trip, we still had the one mile back to the parking. Yeow! 

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Thousand Palms Oasis, all these photos were shot before the fatal kiss the dirt act

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Thousand Palms Oasis, all these photos were shot before the fatal kiss the dirt act


Charles Hobson created a marvelous limited edition artists’ book entitled Trees and it includes a poem by W. S. Merwin. Merwin’s poem is soft and contemplative and conveys a sense of quiet awe as he looked into trees from a mysterious time and place.

© 2010 Charles Hobson, Trees, an edition of thirty copies

© 2010 Charles Hobson, Trees, an edition of thirty copies

When the book is opened, one can read the poem by standing up the first pages and using it to prop each page against it as the pages are turned.

The small tree in the opening at the front of the book is used to suggest the beginning of a recollection of trees in some distant, remembered time, following one of the threads of the poem.

When "accordion’d-out" the book offers a succession of palm trees that can be positioned on different sides of the standing pages, giving a front and back view of the same image. A large architectural model palm tree sits in the window cut in the last panel which is backed by a transparent image of the night sky.

© 2010 Charles Hobson, Trees, 16 pages, 4-1/4 x 12 x 2 inches

© 2010 Charles Hobson, Trees, 16 pages, 4-1/4 x 12 x 2 inches

The monotypes of palm trees are reproduced as high-resolution digital prints on transparency film. The monotypes lay over the words of the poem, which have been set letterpress to follow the shape of the palm tree trunks – the words of the poem climbing the trees.

© 2010 Charles Hobson, Trees

© 2010 Charles Hobson, Trees

When one shines the flashlight on the tree and through the opening at the back of the book, the light projects mysterious shadows of trees against the luminous night sky.

The book can be oriented in several ways, much as the poem offers subtly varied interpretations. Setting it on its side presents the type reading from left to right (rather than up and down), but results in the trees having fallen.

© 2010 Charles Hobson, Trees

© 2010 Charles Hobson, Trees

A stop action animation about the making of Trees with Charles Hobson and Alice Shaw.

You never know what will inspire you and where you will find amazing, superlative ideas.


Tools and Equipment

Well, it’s that time again. Technology changes and with time so does one’s needs. My Sony a33 DSLR camera was showing its years, it took a fall last winter while I was recording videos of my artists’ books Equinox which did not help. During the last months as I opened the flash, I could hear a terrible sound. How long would it last?

Last May, before leaving Boise, Idaho, I purchased a GoPro Hero 5 Black to shoot videos, but I kept my Sony a33 till I reached my hometown.

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, GoPro 5, cute and handy

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, GoPro 5, cute and handy

While in Ottawa, I stopped by Henry’s—the best camera shop—to trade-in my Sony and its lens. Henry’s can trade the gear you have for the gear you want!

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, saying goodbuy to a great camera

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, saying goodbuy to a great camera

A dilemma presented itself—I would not have a DSLR for a few months till I could find and purchase my next camera at a reasonable price. Oh! well, that's life!

Henry's will gladly buy back your second-hand equipment and give you a store credit to use towards a purchase. After showing the salesperson my Sony a33 and the 55mm-200mm lens, my trade-in value went towards the purchase of accessories for my GoPro and a new Vanguard camera bag. My Tamrac bag was still in good condition but heavy and cumbersome. I donated my old Tamrac camera bag to a Goodwill in Worthington, Ohio, hoping someone would enjoy it.

I have been eyeing a Sony Alpha a6000 Mirrorless Digital Camera with 24.3 MP Exmor™ APS HD CMOS image sensor for the last two years. Once I reached Texas, I ordered one and had it shipped to a friend’s place in Austin.

© 2015 B&H, here's my new toy to have fun and enjoy

© 2015 B&H, here's my new toy to have fun and enjoy

I shot many photos with my new Sony a6000 in the last month—the camera did not disappoint. Sony packed many features into this camera. Small (4.7 x 2.6 x 1.8 inches) (120 x 67 x 45 mm), compact, fast, versatile and very affordable—the a6000 is a great camera with a superb image quality. I still need to learn more about its features, but I’m having fun taking pictures as I visit Texas. My only displeasure is the tiltable 3″ LCD with 921K dots, it does not swivel like the LCD screen of the a33. This was a major plus for shooting large manhole covers.

A showcase of some of my favourite photos to date:

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, need to work on the action setting,  T-Bone, Franky, and Ozzie Pearson

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, need to work on the action setting,  T-Bone, Franky, and Ozzie Pearson

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, wonderful details

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, wonderful details

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, love shooting butterflies

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, love shooting butterflies

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, notice mom's leg on baby tortoise

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, notice mom's leg on baby tortoise

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, colours of Texas

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, colours of Texas

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Trattoria Lisina and Mandola Vineyard in Driftwood, Texas

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Trattoria Lisina and Mandola Vineyard in Driftwood, Texas

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, oops! just favourite wine from the Driftwood Estate Winery in Driftwood, Texas

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, oops! just favourite wine from the Driftwood Estate Winery in Driftwood, Texas

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, the San Antonio Express-News building detail

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, the San Antonio Express-News building detail

Another disappointment is finding out my Photoshop version doesn't support RAW images from my new Sony! #@$#^*&%, you know what I mean! No problem with the Sony A33.

Now, with new cameras, I’m ready for the year. The GoPro is excellent for those “Keystone” videos you have been viewing on my blog posts. The Sony a6000 is fantastic for scenes, people, details, art...

New equipment is always expensive for a studio but a must for creativity!!

Oh! I didn’t mention the weight of this little pup. The Sony a6000 is 16.5 oz (468 g) including battery and lens. 

2014 DP Review, for balance I got this lens! NOT!! Can you imagine!

2014 DP Review, for balance I got this lens! NOT!! Can you imagine!

Have you purchased new tools or equipment lately? Which One?

Ohio State University Part 2

While walking around the Ohio State University campus, the Chiller Plant building enticed me to get closer, due to its beautiful kaleidoscope of colours showcased during the day. 

What is a Chiller Plant building you ask?

The Ohio State University's South Campus Central Chiller Plant completed by Ross Barney Architects in 2013, is a long-term, active and sustainable solution for chilled water production and distribution. The building designed to provide an efficient system of air conditioning for the new Medical Center tower and all associated buildings on the campus.

At a mere $72.5 M, the 95,737-square-foot, ten-story, galvanized structural steel and concrete paneled building serves as an iconic anchor at an important pathway to the main campus. 

The result is a dynamic and striking piece of infrastructure that changes as the 177 dichroic fins and eight glass boxes cast shadows of varying sizes, colour and intensity, providing an ever-shifting, non-static facade.


In another part of the campus, I found myself fascinated by large numbers. These painted and cut numbers are made of stoneware, concrete, bronze, steel, and granite. After taking a few photos and researching the why of this installation, I found the Garden of Constants by Barbara Grygutis completed in 1993. 

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Garden of Constants on the campus of the Ohio State University

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Garden of Constants on the campus of the Ohio State University

Jim Jenkins, what do you think?

The numbers depicted are absolute numbers chosen because of their special meaning to the scientific community. They represent mathematics and engineering programs at Ohio State. The public sculpture was commissioned by the Ohio State University Percent for the Arts. Subcontracted and fabricated by Barbara Grygutis, the Ohio Precast and Mt Vernon Machine & Tool, Inc.

One can find fifty individual formulas cast in bronze and embedded in handmade pavers. The formulas highlight the activities performed in the four buildings surrounding the courtyard, emphasizing the theme of constant numbers.

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Alum Creek Campground, Columbus Ohio

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Alum Creek Campground, Columbus Ohio

With a new perspective, I'm enjoying visiting old and novel places along the way as my studio travels this year.

Ohio State University, Ohio

Our roaming led us towards Ohio. Memories of living in Kent rushed through my mind. I welcomed a visit to the Ohio State University’s Thompson Library. 

Back in 2005-2006, my contact, Susan Wyngard acquired many of my artists’ books for the Fine Arts Library. Since then the Thompson library has gone through many changes, from staff succession to architecture re-design.

I communicated with Jolie Braun the new contact person in Special Collection. Jolie was delighted to meet and talk about my books published since 2007.

William Oxley Thompson Memorial Library is the main library on the Ohio State University Columbus campus and the largest library of the Ohio State University Library System. The Thompson Library was renovated four times since its construction in 1913; the most recent renovation completed in 2009. The 306,000 square-foot renovated building contains the library’s 1.25 million volume collection.

With this new re-design, the library went from dark to light and airy. The 30 feet tall ceiling of the grand reference hall from 1913 was restored and is symbolic of the entire re-design.

Here is a retrospective look at Ohio State's century-old library and changes over the years, culminating in a three-year renovation project completed in 2009

This is a shorter video on the hundred-million dollar facelift that made the William Oxley Thompson Library the jewel of the campus.

What caught my eye was the Foundation Stones set in the terrazzo of the library's ground and first floors. One can see forty-nine metal plates documenting forms of written communication from around the globe.  Forty-five additional etchings were designed on the doors of the Stacks Tower elevators. Read all about the foundation stones in this brochure.

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Braille at the entrance of the library, Foundation Stones of the Thompson Library, Columbus, OH

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Braille at the entrance of the library, Foundation Stones of the Thompson Library, Columbus, OH

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Hiragana, a Japanese  Syllabary, Foundation Stones of the Thompson Library, Columbus, OH

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Hiragana, a Japanese  Syllabary, Foundation Stones of the Thompson Library, Columbus, OH

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Linear B, a syllabary used to write pre-Homeric Greek, Foundation Stones of the Thompson Library, Columbus, OH

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Linear B, a syllabary used to write pre-Homeric Greek, Foundation Stones of the Thompson Library, Columbus, OH

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Egyptian Hieroglyphics, Foundation Stones of the Thompson Library, Columbus, OH

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Egyptian Hieroglyphics, Foundation Stones of the Thompson Library, Columbus, OH

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Latin Alphabet, Foundation Stones of the Thompson Library, Columbus, OH

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Latin Alphabet, Foundation Stones of the Thompson Library, Columbus, OH

It was great walking around this feat of architecture. During my visit, students filled the first and ground floors, meeting, talking, reading... The jewel is a success!

Going back to my visit—what about sales you say! Jolie was interested but I’m still waiting on THE EMAIL from the library!!

Ontario

My holiday back home has come to an end. It's difficult to say goodbye but time to leave and find a more temperate climate for the winter. Our small trailer is not four seasons and not suited for the coldest season of the year in Ottawa.

© 2017 Louise Levergneux

© 2017 Louise Levergneux

Before leaving Canada, I wanted to pay a visit to Marlene MacCallum’s studio in the south-west part of Ontario.

Marlene and her husband, David Morrish prepared a wonderful meal before taking the time to show us their studio still being built by David. After we visited the different rooms that comprise the full working area in their new home, Marlene brought some of her wonderful artists’ books for me to view and handle. What a privilege!

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, the room where Marlene binds her books

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, the room where Marlene binds her books

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Marlene and David share this room where all the digital and printing is done, the red cover protects a really big printer, NICE!

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Marlene and David share this room where all the digital and printing is done, the red cover protects a really big printer, NICE!

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, press room is in the works

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, press room is in the works

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, David showing drawers of many typesets while Marlene talks about her artists' book "Nine Elevated Views". You can  view this book  on my post dated May 21st.

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, David showing drawers of many typesets while Marlene talks about her artists' book "Nine Elevated Views". You can view this book on my post dated May 21st.

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, one of the press studios

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, one of the press studios

Marlene uses photogravure, a historical photo/intaglio process that dates from 1879. Marlene’s chosen media plays a large role both in the way it translates the subject and in the effect of the presentation.

The interaction of ink and paper with its tactile and physical presence bring to mind a state of photographic memory which can be felt in Marlene’s books and subjects.

The visual interpretation of personal domestic space and the ordinary stuff of daily life has been the consistent pursuit of my practice. I am fascinated by our relationship with the spaces that frame and objects that fill the majority of daily lives, and yet, are overlooked as we move through our daily routines in a state of inattentional blindness.
I begin by making photographic records. A visual occurrence that startles me out of my routine relationship with objects and spaces prompts the image choice. The gathering of images results in a visual archive of the ephemeral moments linked by a sense of the uncanny or a spatial déjà vu. Drawing on this source, I then build suites of prints or artist’s books that offer the viewer a sense of the strangely familiar.
The artist’s book affords me the opportunity to integrate a variety of printing methodologies and sequential structures in a form that provides the viewer with intimate interaction with the work.
© 2016 M. MacCallum, Tea Ceremonies, (text by Matthew Hollett), hand-bound accordion artists' book with folded paper cover and wrapper, images printed in photogravure and lithography, text printed in letterpress 

© 2016 M. MacCallum, Tea Ceremonies, (text by Matthew Hollett), hand-bound accordion artists' book with folded paper cover and wrapper, images printed in photogravure and lithography, text printed in letterpress 

© 2016 M. MacCallum, Tea Ceremonies, view of the third-page spread, 19.5 x 13.1 x 1.5 cm (closed dimension), 19 x 25.4 cm (page spread)

© 2016 M. MacCallum, Tea Ceremonies, view of the third-page spread, 19.5 x 13.1 x 1.5 cm (closed dimension), 19 x 25.4 cm (page spread)

© 2016 M. MacCallum, Tea Ceremonies, view of the ninth page spread

© 2016 M. MacCallum, Tea Ceremonies, view of the ninth page spread

Tea Ceremonies is a collaboration with Newfoundland artist and writer, Matthew Hollett. The piece began with Matthew’s text and I created an image response and designed the book layout and structure. 
This work celebrates everyday rituals and small ceremonies. The piece explores repetition and sequence in its use of layered text paralleling the way everyday activities leave residue. Text, photogravure images and lithographic tea stains interact in counterpoint throughout the sequence of the book. residue. Text, photogravure images and lithographic tea stains interact in counterpoint throughout the sequence of the book.
© 2014  M. MacCallum, Wall Stories, (text by Jessica Grant), hand-bound accordion book work, view of installation at The Unfolding Narrative at the Parrott Art Gallery in Belleville, Ontario

© 2014  M. MacCallum, Wall Stories, (text by Jessica Grant), hand-bound accordion book work, view of installation at The Unfolding Narrative at the Parrott Art Gallery in Belleville, Ontario

© 2014  M. MacCallum, Wall Stories, dust jacket, inkjet on Digital Aya paper, view of title page, 26 x 20 x 1.2 cm (closed dimension)

© 2014  M. MacCallum, Wall Stories, dust jacket, inkjet on Digital Aya paper, view of title page, 26 x 20 x 1.2 cm (closed dimension)

© 2014  M. MacCallum, Wall Stories, view of second-page spread, 25.6 x 39.3 cm

© 2014  M. MacCallum, Wall Stories, view of second-page spread, 25.6 x 39.3 cm

Wall Stories is a collaboration with Newfoundland writer Jessica Grant. This piece brings a different perspective to my examination of everyday spaces. Jessica’s text, The Great Indoors, and my Townsite home images interact to create a celebration of interior life with special attention to the collection of objects and the adornment of surfaces. Elements of the external world are miniaturized and nested within living spaces inverting the inside out logic of homes. The first iteration of this collaboration was published by the Journal of Artists’ Books as part of the artists’ project Switching Places.
© 2013  M. MacCallum, Corner a handbound accordion book with slipcase, the structure is held closed into a codex form by sewing across the spine into the end pages. 26.1 x 13.2 x 2.4 cm (closed dimension)

© 2013  M. MacCallum, Corner a handbound accordion book with slipcase, the structure is held closed into a codex form by sewing across the spine into the end pages. 26.1 x 13.2 x 2.4 cm (closed dimension)

© 2013  M. MacCallum, Corner, front and back end pages slip into the cover pockets, the book block is printed in photogravure on Somerset paper and the cover is inkjet on coated Tyvek

© 2013  M. MacCallum, Corner, front and back end pages slip into the cover pockets, the book block is printed in photogravure on Somerset paper and the cover is inkjet on coated Tyvek

© 2013  M. MacCallum, Corner

© 2013  M. MacCallum, Corner

© 2012   M. MacCallum, Theme and Permutation, hand sewn pamphlet, images custom-printed in offset lithography on Mohawk Superfine, text printed in inkjet, covers are inkjets printed on translucent Glama, 23.5 x 21.6 x .6 cm (closed dimension)

© 2012   M. MacCallum, Theme and Permutation, hand sewn pamphlet, images custom-printed in offset lithography on Mohawk Superfine, text printed in inkjet, covers are inkjets printed on translucent Glama, 23.5 x 21.6 x .6 cm (closed dimension)

© 2012   M. MacCallum, Theme and Permutation

© 2012   M. MacCallum, Theme and Permutation

Theme and Permutation is one of a series of artist’s books inspired by the experience of living in Corner Brook’s Townsite area on the west coast of the island of Newfoundland. 
Between 1924-34 the pulp mill built 150 homes to house the mill management and skilled or to highly renovated. This project gave me the rare opportunity to record the evolution of interior aspects of these homes. It has been the context to explore the paradoxical phenomena of conformity and individualization that occurs in a company town. Having grown up in a suburban housing development, my earliest memories of home is that of living in a space that is reminiscent of my neighbors’. Each artist’s book explores a distinct facet of image memory, multiplicity, sequence and offers the viewer a visual equivalence of the uncanny.
Theme and Permutation is a response to the permutations and variations of the type-4 Townsite House. Digital tools were used to translate the original film source of eight different window images from five houses. The sixteen offset lithographic plates were custom printed in twenty-nine separate press runs. Each image is the result of a different combination of plates. The structure is a sewn pamphlet with translucent covers. The viewer enters the body of the book with a tritone image of a single Townsite window. As one moves into the piece, new window images appear and layer over each other. The images become darker and more heavily layered towards the mid-point. The center spread has an inkjet layer of two text blocks printed over the offset litho images. The text speaks of the history of the homes, the architectural permutations and economic shifts within the Townsite area. The ensuing pages continue to provide new combinations of window layers, gradually lightening in tonality and allowing the individual windows to become more distinct. A third text block provides a personal narrative. The piece concludes with a tritone image of one of the Townsite windows in original condition. 

I don’t have time or space to create these days being on the road, but this time in my life is wonderful, I enjoy meeting and reading first-hand amazing works by artists’ bookmakers around the country.

I will be in Austin, Texas for most of the month of November. If you know about my new my journey and would like to introduce me to your work.

Let me know, I would love to visit your studio !

West Virginia, Part 1

We left the Smoky Mountains to visit with friends Alex and David Bennet at the Mountain Quest Institute near Frost, West Virginia.

Going around many curves on Hwy 84 in West Virginia.

In this majestic landscape, I ventured to visit the wonderful and impressive horses on the grounds of the Institute. 

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, waiting and ready for a photo

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, waiting and ready for a photo

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, finally the correct shot

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, finally the correct shot

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, thanks for the photo

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, thanks for the photo

As I walked the land, I noticed silver threads of a cob web in the corner of a fence produced by the sun’s rays and a yellow-coloured fly sitting for a photograph. Do you recognize this fly? Is it native to West Virginia?

© 2017 Louise Levergneux

© 2017 Louise Levergneux

Insects as a subject never attracted me till my project Outside the Studio. I incorporated a few bees and beetles and enjoyed catching butterflies fluttering about with my camera.

Libby Barrett’s books capture my attention as I write this post. Libby lives and works in Maine and is often inspired by insects. Many of her book ideas offer possibilities for unusual interpretations.

Libby expresses her love for puns and interest in invertebrates in her artists’ book Web Site. This book is a whimsical interpretation of the theme of an exhibition entitled Spineless Wonders presented at the University of Southern Maine. The four-sided drop box holds an origami spider who's waiting for dinner. 

© 2009 Libby Barrett,  Web Site

© 2009 Libby Barrett, Web Site

There in the corner, or under the stair, 

behind the bookcase, or most anywhere anywhere

waiting........ 

Silken thread woven, the vigil begins

hoping that dinner will be captured therein

waiting....... 

The web trembles, dinner has arrived

On today's menu, bluebottle fly

 

For the same show, Libby published an artists’ book entitled Coleoptera. The specimen box is full of little books about beetles. The illustrations are a combination of watercolour and coloured pencil. Each shell swivels to reveal information about the particular beetle illustrated or about beetles in general, and each book is secured in the box with a pin. 

© 2009 Libby Barrett,  Coleoptera

© 2009 Libby Barrett, Coleoptera

© 2009 Libby Barrett,  Coleoptera

© 2009 Libby Barrett, Coleoptera

© 2009 Libby Barrett,  Coleoptera

© 2009 Libby Barrett, Coleoptera

Libby’s latest book Travel Bugs incorporates a series of collages of beetles for which she uses old maps and atlases as collage material. 

© 2017 Libby Barrett,  Travel Bugs

© 2017 Libby Barrett, Travel Bugs

© 2017 Libby Barrett,  Travel Bugs

© 2017 Libby Barrett, Travel Bugs

© 2017 Libby Barrett,  Travel Bugs, detail

© 2017 Libby Barrett, Travel Bugs, detail

This book produced for a group exhibit where the only guideline was that the book structure had to be based on the accordion structure. I decided to stay with the basic structure and use images of my travel bugs as the subject matter. I wish that I could say that the cover paper was my design, but it came from my stash of purchased paper. I chose it because it made me think of the meandering path a bug might take.

Watch your environment and see what surrounds you. Let me know what inspires you from the world’s details.


Comment Note: I would love to respond to the comments I receive. Unfortunately, Squarespace does not provide the name of the commenter and no way for me to respond, unless I respond to the comment directly on the blog. I would love to reciprocate your time and comment on my last blog post--please end your comment with email address or name. Thanks for your comments, please continue!

Change and Transformation

Change /CHānj/: to make or become different, to transform, to alter. 

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Spring around Avimor in Boise, Idaho

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Spring around Avimor in Boise, Idaho

Spring brings many changes, the season helps to renew our vitality. The drumleaf binding for my last artists’ book Shadow Me was a transformation. Learning brings change. 

2017, the year of the Fire Rooster brought a significant change of energy for all of us and is providing a strong foundation for us to reach a new level and redefine a new destination!

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Spring in the foothills of Boise, Idaho

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, Spring in the foothills of Boise, Idaho

How true is this? Many people are changing their lives this year, moving from one place to another, changing jobs, retiring, the list goes on in many forms? 

People are adapting to new circumstances, modifying their philosophies, revising their finances. Others are remodeling their homes, restyling their wardrobe, revamping their hairstyle, reorganizing their thoughts or simply learning new bindings.

My adjustment is a new lifestyle. I’m thinking of retiring from creating artists’ books. Should I close shop? Art has always defined me, it is who I am so the question is hard to answer but there it is, lingering over my head. For now, my books are in my thoughts, I might bring my ideas to fruition later.

Travel is the key at the moment, this will allow me to transform my work if I continue creating. The journey will take me to new directions, where I could connect with artists, librarians, organizations, and centers across Canada and the US.  

My artists’ book Finding Home was the beginning. It exemplified my need to find where I belonged after a move to Boise, Idaho, in June of 2015. I’ve concluded Canada is the place for me, my place to belong.

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, trails in Avimor, Idaho

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, trails in Avimor, Idaho

Transformation in my world will be a great opportunity to meet with you and talk on the subject of artists' books, visit your studio, and blog. See you soon!

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, hiking the trails edge in Avimor, Idaho

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, hiking the trails edge in Avimor, Idaho

New Year, New beginnings!

Celebrating one year of blogging! It’s been a pleasure getting to know all of you through my posts. Thank you for the support.

Major changes are in the air for my 1/2 Measure Studio this year. The reasoning behind my books is on my mind these days. I’m questioning the trajectory of my work. Changing paths is a big moment and one I want to see bring forward movement to my work. 

For now, confusion! Why do this? Why do that? Why be an artist? 

Do you have questions that haunt you as an artist? 

In the last month, I have been working on a new artists’ book—a sequel to my book entitled Beside Me. Beside Me was a wonderful book on teams published in 2005.

How do your books come to life?

Mine usually start with a trip, a thought, an experience... This one started with an emotion.

Completely filled with emotion, my mind started to think of how to create this book and in what format. Thoughts raced through my mind.

Think, re-think, plan, images, dream, re-think, write, view it in my mind’s eye, dream of it, camera in hand, photograph, template, re-think, write, play in Photoshop, design pages, dream, cover? Binding! Think! Choose fonts, discussion, re-think, compose photographs, relate to book Beside Me, write, edit, paper size, size of book, re-design, Edit...

Ideas have gelled, cover and binding chosen. The real work starts and frustrations follow!

I had difficulties in ordering paper with the proper grain direction needed for printing the pages of my book. Was everyone in the companies I called asleep at the switch? After many phone calls, I’m hoping to receive the correct paper. 

Particular companies understand book publishing and grain directions. One of those companies is Moab papers by Legion. They are always happy to talk about the needs of their customers.

What type of difficulties do you run into with paper? Size, grain direction, thickness, durability...

This waiting period is giving me time to conceive the cover and how the new book will flow with the first book Beside Me.

© 2016 Louise Levergneux, cover of Standing Alone

© 2016 Louise Levergneux, cover of Standing Alone

I continue working on my files of manhole covers to create eleven new volumes of different cities across the Canadian provinces.

©2016 Louise Levergneux, Saskatchewan manhole covers in Bridge ready to action in Photoshop

©2016 Louise Levergneux, Saskatchewan manhole covers in Bridge ready to action in Photoshop

© 2013 Louise Leverghneux, Hotel Aloft, Minneapolis, MN, April 30, 2013

© 2013 Louise Leverghneux, Hotel Aloft, Minneapolis, MN, April 30, 2013


I hope happiness and prosperity comes your way in 2017!