Sarasota, Florida

I was very engaged in Florida, exploring studios and visiting libraries to present my artists’ books to Special Collections. My séjour facilitated contacting a few librarians and even had the opportunity to re-connect with an artists’ book that was previously acquired.

I reached out to the Florida Atlantic University, the Flagler College, Florida International University, Florida State University, Miami University, Ringling College of Art and Design, University of Central Florida, University of South Florida, and the Southern Florida University.

© 2019 Louise Levergneux. The Alfred R Goldstein Library at Ringling College of Art and Design.

© 2019 Louise Levergneux. The Alfred R Goldstein Library at Ringling College of Art and Design.

© 2019 Louise Levergneux. The Alfred R Goldstein Library lobby.

© 2019 Louise Levergneux. The Alfred R Goldstein Library lobby.

© 2019 Louise Levergneux. Brizdle-choenberg Special Collections Center at the Alfred R Goldstein Library.

© 2019 Louise Levergneux. Brizdle-choenberg Special Collections Center at the Alfred R Goldstein Library.

Showcasing my published books to the Brizdle-choenberg Special Collections Center was a distinct pleasure. Special Collections specializes in artists’ publication projects, prints, and rare books at Ringling College of Art and Design. Janelle Rebel invited the special collections assistant Ali Vargas-Fournier and the director of library services Kristina Keough to join us in the discovering of specific bindings and subject matter.

It was undoubtedly a successful meeting with the acquisition of Decades Apart, 26NOV2006, Xtraction and four flip books from the Outside of the Studio Series to the Alfred R Goldstein Library. The library selected books that would be appreciated in a research consultation by art, photography, animation, and film students and art and design practitioners.

© 2008 Louise Levergneux. 26NOV2006, last copy acquired by the Special Collections of the Alfred R Goldstein Library.

© 2008 Louise Levergneux. 26NOV2006, last copy acquired by the Special Collections of the Alfred R Goldstein Library.

© 2019 Louise Levergneux. Decades Apart, copy 4, last copy acquired by the Special Collections of the Alfred R Goldstein Library.

© 2019 Louise Levergneux. Decades Apart, copy 4, last copy acquired by the Special Collections of the Alfred R Goldstein Library.

© 2012 Louise Levergneux. Air.2 from the series Outside the Studio acquired by the Special Collections of the Alfred R Goldstein Library, Earth.11, H2O.3, and FIRE.3 were also purchused.

© 2012 Louise Levergneux. Air.2 from the series Outside the Studio acquired by the Special Collections of the Alfred R Goldstein Library, Earth.11, H2O.3, and FIRE.3 were also purchused.

© 2019 Louise Levergneux. Xtraction, copy 1, last copy acquired by the Special Collections of the Alfred R Goldstein Library.

© 2019 Louise Levergneux. Xtraction, copy 1, last copy acquired by the Special Collections of the Alfred R Goldstein Library.

© 2019 Louise Levergneux. Desert Swatches was acquired in 2014 by the Special Collections of the Alfred R Goldstein Library.

© 2019 Louise Levergneux. Desert Swatches was acquired in 2014 by the Special Collections of the Alfred R Goldstein Library.

© 2019 Louise Levergneux. Desert Swatches with its catalogue information.

© 2019 Louise Levergneux. Desert Swatches with its catalogue information.

© 2012 Louise Levergneux. Desert Swatches.

© 2012 Louise Levergneux. Desert Swatches.

The Alfred R. Goldstein Library a state-of-the-art building that seeks to transform the way that users engage with library collections and services, opened in January 2017. Architecturally stunning, and an active physical and digital destination on the Ringling College campus.

© 2019 Louise Levergneux. The Alfred R Goldstein Library lobby showcasing Julie Miller Kanapaux artwork,  Momentum  2016 .

© 2019 Louise Levergneux. The Alfred R Goldstein Library lobby showcasing Julie Miller Kanapaux artwork, Momentum 2016.

One can find, broadsides, democratic multiples, documentation of time-based and performance projects, engravings, exhibition publications, experimental writing, fine press books, flip books, handmade editions, historic facsimiles, parlor toys, photo-bookworks, prints, rare books, and zines in the collection.


© 2019 Louise Levergneux. Exhibition “Step and Repeat: Pattern in Artists' Publications” at the Alfred R Goldstein Library.

© 2019 Louise Levergneux. Exhibition “Step and Repeat: Pattern in Artists' Publications” at the Alfred R Goldstein Library.

© 2019 Louise Levergneux. Detail of the exhibition, right: Josh MacPhee,  Security   Fear , 2017

© 2019 Louise Levergneux. Detail of the exhibition, right: Josh MacPhee, Security Fear, 2017

During my visit I was experience the Special Collections' most recent exhibition "Step and Repeat: Pattern in Artists' Publications." The exhibit in the reading room excavates the pleasures of pattern in the coverings, interiors, linings, and details of thirty artists’ publications. Visually arranged into conceptual motifs (flora & fauna, power, psychedelic, geometric, experimental, liquid, figures, and security), these books aim to mesmerize, distract, propel, disrupt, and entice the reader.

© 2019 Louise Levergneux. Books in the show, middle: Clifton Meador,  Kor  2007; middle back: Ral Veroni, Gabo Ferro, Flopa Lestani,  Nada para el Destino = Nothing for Destiny  2009.

© 2019 Louise Levergneux. Books in the show, middle: Clifton Meador, Kor 2007; middle back: Ral Veroni, Gabo Ferro, Flopa Lestani, Nada para el Destino = Nothing for Destiny 2009.

© 2019 Louise Levergneux. left: Barbara Hodgson  Mrs Delany Meets Herr Haeckl Radiolaria, Retracoralla, Pediastra, Ciliata, etc. , Rendered in Paper Mosaicks, 2015; right: Sheryl Oppenheim,  Sample Book  2017.

© 2019 Louise Levergneux. left: Barbara Hodgson Mrs Delany Meets Herr Haeckl Radiolaria, Retracoralla, Pediastra, Ciliata, etc., Rendered in Paper Mosaicks, 2015; right: Sheryl Oppenheim, Sample Book 2017.

© 2019 Louise Levergneux. Nick Butcher and Nadine Nakanishi  Graphic Arts Future Corporeal Knowledge  2017.

© 2019 Louise Levergneux. Nick Butcher and Nadine Nakanishi Graphic Arts Future Corporeal Knowledge 2017.

© 2019 Louise Levergneux. left: Chris Fitzpatrick and Karel Martens,  Motion  2017; middle: Julie Peters and Karel Martens,  Full Color  2013; right: Marianne Dages and Leah Mackin,  Ultrices  2016.

© 2019 Louise Levergneux. left: Chris Fitzpatrick and Karel Martens, Motion 2017; middle: Julie Peters and Karel Martens, Full Color 2013; right: Marianne Dages and Leah Mackin, Ultrices 2016.

It’s always nice to personally meet contacts/librarians of special collections and introduce my artists’ books particularly when an genuine interest is shown.

© 2019 Louise Levergneux. Ringling College of Art and Design building.

© 2019 Louise Levergneux. Ringling College of Art and Design building.


New Acquisitions on the Road

As an artist, I recognize my world and the many hours I spend on administrivia. The constant disruption of non-stop tasks is troublesome but necessary. I schedule my creativity in between the repetitive tasks and hope there is enough time to finish what delights me.

Apart from the creativity and the operation of a business, it’s meaningful for me to have my published books acquired by collections. How do you manage this part of your art world? How do you create opportunities to sell? Communicating and visiting libraries is all part of the fun side of the territory. The artist is likely the optimum person to talk, explain or promote hers/his work. The creator knows all the details, the frustrations, and the stories behind the wonderful final product—the artists’ book.

I benefited from the privilege of engaging with other dealers in the past. I still pursue an excellent relationship with Vamp & Tramp, Booksellers, LLC out of Birmingham, Alabama.

I discovered that presenting your work is a bit of an adventure. I enjoy seeing the expression of someone reading/viewing my book for the first time. Since some of my books exhibit a playful aspect, the smiles and laughter are inspiring. Traveling and meeting with librarians in the previous year contributed to my self-reflection and recognition of who I am as an artist.

In the Spring, I reached out to Katherine Krzys, Archivist, Interim Head of Distinctive Collections Curator at the Arizona State University Library. The artists’ book collection includes small-print publications created as works of art, exemplifying the importance of collaboration between a writer, artist, papermaker, and printer. Katherine was interested in Entre deux and La Guadalupe and purchased both for the Rare Books and Manuscripts Library. deux and La Guadalupe and purchased both for the Rare Books and Manuscripts Library. 

© 2013 Louise Levergneux, Entre deux

© 2013 Louise Levergneux, Entre deux

© 2013 Louise Levergneux, Entre deux

© 2013 Louise Levergneux, Entre deux

© 2013 Louise Levergneux, La Guadalupe

© 2013 Louise Levergneux, La Guadalupe

© 2013 Louise Levergneux, La Guadalupe

© 2013 Louise Levergneux, La Guadalupe

© 2018 Louise Levergneux, Vernon Alden Library, Ohio UNiversity in Athens, Ohio

© 2018 Louise Levergneux, Vernon Alden Library, Ohio UNiversity in Athens, Ohio

In June, I visited with Michele Jennings at the Vernon Alden Library of the Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. I was fascinated by what books attracted Michele. I received an email just the other day that Michelle was interested in adding 26NOV2006 to the Arts and Archives Library collection.

© 2008 Louise Levergneux, 26NOV2006

© 2008 Louise Levergneux, 26NOV2006

© 2008 Louise Levergneux, 26NOV2006

© 2008 Louise Levergneux, 26NOV2006

I communicated with Jessy Randall, Curator, and Archivist of The Tutt Library of the Colorado College in Colorado Springs. The library maintains collections of rare books, special editions, manuscripts, and published archival material on Colorado. Two volumes of City Shields that include manhole covers around Denver, Vail, Highlands Ranch, and Colorado Springs were added to Special Collections.

© 2018 Louise Levergneux, Tutt Library at the Colorado College in Colorado Springs

© 2018 Louise Levergneux, Tutt Library at the Colorado College in Colorado Springs

© 2016 Louise Levergneux, City Shields, Colorado volume 1

© 2016 Louise Levergneux, City Shields, Colorado volume 1

© 2016 Louise Levergneux, City Shields, Colorado volume 2

© 2016 Louise Levergneux, City Shields, Colorado volume 2

At the beginning of July, I met with Holly Prochaska, MLIS Preservation Librarian of The Robert A Deshon & Karl J Schlachter Library for Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning at the University of Cincinnati. The DAAP Library acquires examples of works in order to provide a rounded view of contemporary attitudes towards the book and to inspire students to think outside the book. Holly is a welcoming individual who also creates artists’ books. In the end, Holly purchased Xtraction and City Shields—the nine Ohio volumes for the Special Collection. 

© 2018 Louise Levergneux, an exhibition of globes at The Robert A Deshon & Karl J Schlachter Library for Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning at the University of Cincinnati

© 2018 Louise Levergneux, an exhibition of globes at The Robert A Deshon & Karl J Schlachter Library for Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning at the University of Cincinnati

© 2018 Louise Levergneux, display of artists' books at the DAAP Library of the University of Cincinnati. A book by JoAnna Poehlmann attracted me with its delicate detail of a tulip, just gorgeous! On the last shelf is the Bon Bon Mots of Julie Chen.

© 2018 Louise Levergneux, display of artists' books at the DAAP Library of the University of Cincinnati. A book by JoAnna Poehlmann attracted me with its delicate detail of a tulip, just gorgeous! On the last shelf is the Bon Bon Mots of Julie Chen.

© 2016 Louise Levergneux, Xtraction

© 2016 Louise Levergneux, Xtraction

© 2016 Louise Levergneux, Xtraction

© 2016 Louise Levergneux, Xtraction

© 2006 Louise Levergneux, City Shields, Ohio volume No 5

© 2006 Louise Levergneux, City Shields, Ohio volume No 5

Excited when reading obsession, Holly decided to add a copy for her own personal collection.

© 2012 Louise Levergneux, obsession

© 2012 Louise Levergneux, obsession

© 2012 Louise Levergneux, obsession

© 2012 Louise Levergneux, obsession

One can never expect to land a sale while visiting a library; but I have been surprised at the response to my publications.

Enjoy your visit and contacts when you can, since it is the best part of the business of art, apart from creating your work.

Rochester, New York

I finally crossed the border back into the US on October 17th. I was hoping to be down south before it froze. It was getting colder every day, and the rain never seemed to stop.

On October 18th, in Rochester, New York, the sun was shining and it was a gorgeous day. According to the locals, the temperature was out of season. One of my goals in traveling is to meet with new collection contacts or renew old ones. I love to visit artist's studios, it's fantastic but I also need to distribute my own artists’ books. This is my usual six month of administration duties.

On the road, I emailed contacts of different libraries for a possible visit. I received a quick response from the Rush Rhees Library at the University of Rochester.

© 2017 Google Maps, Rush Rhees Library, Rochester University

© 2017 Google Maps, Rush Rhees Library, Rochester University

© 2015 Al Herms, Google Maps, Rush Rhees Library, Rochester University

© 2015 Al Herms, Google Maps, Rush Rhees Library, Rochester University

I met with Stephanie Frontz, Head of the Art & Music Library and Art Librarian. The Art and Music Library is home to various collections including over 300 artists’ books. On short notice and to my surprise, Stephanie agreed to meet with me outside on Wilson Blvd for an artist’s book tailgate event!

© 2017 Google Maps, Rush Rhees Library, Rochester University

© 2017 Google Maps, Rush Rhees Library, Rochester University

"With this kind of weather everyone wants to be outside, it will not last long,"—Stephanie replied.

Through our conversation, Stephanie showed me her sense of humour by presenting me with a “League of Librarians” trading card-style business card for the University of Rochester reference and liaison librarians.

This project helps students resolve concerns regarding choosing and finding materials. What a fantastic idea! Gamification is the way of the future!

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, I now possess this trading card. Will it grow in value as the years go by? HaHa! Do you have one? Which one?

© 2017 Louise Levergneux, I now possess this trading card. Will it grow in value as the years go by? HaHa! Do you have one? Which one?

After an interesting show and tell, the Art and Music Library acquired five of my artists’ books. Thank you Stephanie!

© 2013 Louise Levergneux,  Entre deux

© 2013 Louise Levergneux, Entre deux

© 2012 Louise Levergneux,  6:45

© 2012 Louise Levergneux, 6:45

© 2012 Louise Levergneux,  E arth.11 from the series  Outside the Studio

© 2012 Louise Levergneux, Earth.11 from the series Outside the Studio

© 2016 Louise Levergneux,  Xtraction

© 2016 Louise Levergneux, Xtraction

© 2016 Louise Levergneux,  Finding Home

© 2016 Louise Levergneux, Finding Home


More Drawings

Last week, I re-drew the final element in Tinkercad for my artists’ book Finding Home. Major problems were surfacing, and the results were not good. Defeat, no way! This simple structure can be 3D printed, I’m sure.

My solution was to break down the sections of my structure into 7 pieces and once printed I would glue the sections together. The question remained, will the parts fit together? I’m hoping it works! 

Friday, I travelled one more time to Unbound to retrieve my work. Well, surprise! surprise! every part fit, amazing!! Persistence as always served me well.

The slipcase for my book Xtraction was also a success. My strategy worked. I’m excited to finish these projects. J'ai le vent en poupe ! I’m on a roll! as they say. I will elaborate on this project later, but here is a photo of the result of the last 3D print of Xtraction's slipcase.

© 2016, Louise Levergneux, 3D printed slipcase for Xtraction

© 2016, Louise Levergneux, 3D printed slipcase for Xtraction


Last week we visited the compelling Clock Drawings by Adrian Göllner. One more drawing from the series is worth looking into because of it’s interesting history.

The MGM blockbuster movie Ben Hur made its screen debut in 1925. Borrowing on its success, the Westclox Clock Company designed a handsome, roman-style alarm clock, which they called the Ben Hur and began marketing in 1927. The Ben Hur clock in my collection was purchased at Rideau Antiques in the Ottawa Valley, so it had likely been the property of a farm family in the vicinity. A mark on the reverse indicates that it had been serviced in 1942, but sometime after that it ceased to run and a repairman scavenged its winding keys. The clock is in poor condition and the spring was broken, but the alarm spring was still partially wound. I suspended the clock movement above a piece of carbon paper and then triggered the alarm. The alarm hammer struck the surface for several seconds. A decidedly men’s-style alarm clock, one might conclude that it was a birthday or Christmas gift for the father of a household. Perhaps he had traveled to the big city, seen the movie and now his family honoured him with a clock of the same name. If that is the case, then memories of the movie and thoughts of his family were an inextricable part of the energy coiled on the alarm spring and which made the marks upon the paper.

© 2010 Adrian Göllner, Ben Hur

© 2010 Adrian Göllner, Ben Hur

Another series, another device. Adrian’s project the Norwegian Wood Drawings configures a turntable so that the vibrations of the needle are transferred onto a drawing surface.

© 2012, Adrian Göllner, Norwegian Wood Drawing Mechanism

© 2012, Adrian Göllner, Norwegian Wood Drawing Mechanism

 A vinyl recording plays on the turntable causing the speaker’s woofer and attached pen to vibrate. The pen is slowly drawn backward across the drawing surface that itself rotates at 33 1/3 rpm.

Adrian’s intention was to divine the shape of John Lennon's loneliness from the grooves of his old Beatles albums. 

“A brilliant but troubled song songwriter, rejection and self loathing underlie many of Lennon's most enduring songs: Girl, I'm a Loser, Help and Norwegian Wood. Speculative? Absolutely. But even the consideration that the lines before us contain the essence of John Lennon’s loneliness make these drawings both curious and compelling.”—Adrian Göllner

© 2012 Adrian Göllner, Come Together, ink on vellum, 34 x 22 inches

© 2012 Adrian Göllner, Come Together, ink on vellum, 34 x 22 inches

© 2012 Adrian Göllner, I Want You, ink on vellum, 34 x 22 inches

© 2012 Adrian Göllner, I Want You, ink on vellum, 34 x 22 inches

© 2012 Adrian Göllner, Across the Universe, ink on vellum, 34 x 22 inches

© 2012 Adrian Göllner, Across the Universe, ink on vellum, 34 x 22 inches


The studio of James G. Jenkins is part of the Water Street Studios an artist co-op in Batavia, Illinois. Lucky to meet this talented artist, luckier to have him as a friend.

Drawing the Line(Somewhere) was made on one of the many bicycle paths around Batavia, Illinois. The reason for building this device was to "connect the dots" around the world to all areas suffering from climate & environmental problems. "We all must "draw the line" on something," says Jenkins. I use this device and performance to demonstrate it. 

© James G. Jenkins, Drawing the Line(Somewhere)

© James G. Jenkins, Drawing the Line(Somewhere)

James also notified the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago that he would be "drawing rings around them." This drawing is from that performance.

© 2004-2006 James G. Jenkins,  Drawing the Line(Somewhere), detail of drawing 

© 2004-2006 James G. Jenkins,  Drawing the Line(Somewhere), detail of drawing 

James’s sculptures provide a theme for both intellectual and visual curiosity. They contain road maps directing the observer through a process of distillation and fusion of contrasting ideas and investigative humour. James a genius at work is always happy to show you around his studio and direct you to the actual installations around Illinois. If you are in Illinois, James's studio is worth the visit!

 

These wonderful well thought out art pieces leave me with deep thoughts...

 

 

 

Flip Books and 3D Printing

I found one thing I miss from living in Utah, the Sundance Film Festival in Park City. I took this photo in 2014 on our annual–go see what it’s all about—visit. We had the opportunity to say hello to Sam Shepard and to Gilles Marini.

© 2014 Louise Levergneux, Sundance Film Festival

© 2014 Louise Levergneux, Sundance Film Festival

Getting back to the work at hand. It’s difficult to keep the processes and steps straight with three projects on the go, no four! 

I’m waiting for an order of paper to finish the last two copies of my book entitled Conversation. After two months, finishing these copies with my notes might be a challenge!! 

Meanwhile, I’m tinkering with Tinkercad for my second book entitled Finding Home. An emotional project that tackles my experience of living in Idaho while still rooted in Canada... I will discuss the many changes and end product later.

I am learning the ins and outs of 3D printing and enjoying the sculptural facet of the process. A third print is happening today and will take nine and a half hours to print over 497 layers. Fascinating!

I thought it might be fun to sit and take photos as my object was printing till I saw this timelapse video of a Ultimaker 2 printing a deer. Have you ever heard the expression “it’s like watching paint dry”

The binding and slipcase for my artists’ book Xtraction is also in the queue to be 3D printed, hurray!

While we wait for paper and prints, lets look at the steps it took to create the flip book for Xtraction. The idea grew from this X-ray. In this instance I used a mix of stills and video taken with my Sony D-SLR.

© 2013 Louise Levergneux

© 2013 Louise Levergneux

 1. First, the stills are manipulated in Photoshop and the video manipulated in iMovie

2. Next, I import the frames from the video into layers in Photoshop

3. Once, the layers are all chosen and sequenced, they are resized into another Photoshop template, I number all the pages—yes, number, it makes it easier to sort. Have you ever had 120 unnumbered pages fall to the floor and not knowing the sequence? I have! FUN! FUN! FUN!

4. All the adjustments in the next step is great fun for people with OCD, as all the layers have different opacity between bottom and top layers for each group of images. The flip book has 120 pages counting the colophon

5. Shown are 13" x 19" sheets of pages in Bridge ready for print

© 2014 Louise Levergneux, Xtraction

© 2014 Louise Levergneux, Xtraction

6. My printer co-operated, thank God! This does not always happen, everyone knows that! I start the cutting phase after the sheets rest for 24 hours. This time relaxes the paper and removes any curling from wet ink. Dried ink allows the paper to be handled without concerns 

© 2014 Louise Levergneux, Xtraction

© 2014 Louise Levergneux, Xtraction

7. Each page goes through a five steps cutting process, this ensures perfect placement of image on each page. The time taken in properly cutting each page properly gives a smooth action when flipping pages. I know these steps by heart after cutting pages for 156 flip books in the last 3 years. First cut is done by dividing the sheet in half.

© 2014 Louise Levergneux, Xtraction

© 2014 Louise Levergneux, Xtraction

© 2014 Louise Levergneux, Xtraction

© 2014 Louise Levergneux, Xtraction

The second cut is done by following the cutting lines for the top of each page.

© 2014 Louise Levergneux, Xtraction

© 2014 Louise Levergneux, Xtraction

Making sure that all the pages are trimmed at the exact same place on the right edge is the third cut.

© 2014 Louise Levergneux, Xtraction

© 2014 Louise Levergneux, Xtraction

The fourth step is to properly cut the bottom of each page by using a straight edge that will not move.

© 2014 Louise Levergneux, Xtraction

© 2014 Louise Levergneux, Xtraction

The last and fifth cut is the left side with a pre-determined length for the flip book.

© 2014 Louise Levergneux, Xtraction

© 2014 Louise Levergneux, Xtraction

I sort and stack, then punch holes through the pages to receive screw posts

© 2014 Louise Levergneux, Xtraction

© 2014 Louise Levergneux, Xtraction

A small binding with cloth over boards is usually cut and assembled to finish the book. Xtraction has a 3D printed binding so this step is omitted

Voilà, one finished flip book. I will have photos of the completed project next week.

The fourth project I mentioned above is the image manipulation, printing and cutting of the last volumes of City Shields. Forever!

© 2011 Louise Levergneux, City Shields

© 2011 Louise Levergneux, City Shields

This will take more than a week, need to get going.