Drawing

Would you like to delegate certain tasks?

My work exhilarates me and I enjoy the activities in my studio. Certain activities are monotonous repetitions. After a day of these, I get cross-eyed. 

The learning curve with Tinkercad is more work than I assessed. I have figured out how the Ultimaker 2 3D printer handles measurements depending on heights and widths. I have redrawn my prints so many times...did I mention redo, redo, redo and redo! Oh! and re-measure. An Epson or an Ultimaker 2, Aargh!

As simple as my Tinkercad drawings are they are difficult to print. I should job out this task for sure! There were changes and savings too numerous to illustrate. Here are a few images that show the steps I took to break down the slipcase into two pieces to print. The last drawing is ready for print. Let's see if this works!

© 2016 Louise Levergneux, 3D printed slipcase for Xtraction

© 2016 Louise Levergneux, 3D printed slipcase for Xtraction

© 2016 Louise Levergneux, 3D printed slipcase for Xtraction

© 2016 Louise Levergneux, 3D printed slipcase for Xtraction

© 2016 Louise Levergneux, 3D printed slipcase for Xtraction

© 2016 Louise Levergneux, 3D printed slipcase for Xtraction

© 2016 Louise Levergneux, 3D printed slipcase for Xtraction

© 2016 Louise Levergneux, 3D printed slipcase for Xtraction

© 2016 Louise Levergneux, 3D printed slipcase for Xtraction

© 2016 Louise Levergneux, 3D printed slipcase for Xtraction


Do you thrive on endless repetitions? Is it meditation?

Which experience is worse drawing in Tinkercad or Miguel Endara’s pencil touching the paper 32 million times to create Hero?


Karina Smigla-Bobinski gave the task of drawing to the audience that came to play with her kinetic sculpture installation.

ADA is a post-industrial "creature" self-forming artwork. She is a 3m diameter PVC balloon performance machine and her patterns of lines and points, get more and more complex as the number of people playing increases. What an experience this must have been! 


Adrian Göllner, an installation artist who collects old wind-up alarm clocks. Compelled by the energy stored in the spring of over-wound clocks, Adrian channelled this found energy into drawings. 

The Clock Drawings were either created by the clock’s movement, which was directly set atop a piece of carbon paper, or the movement was suspended just above the carbon paper. In both cases, when the alarm spring was released, the hammer struck the surface and made a mark.

Each clock used to create a drawing had its own particular temperament. Getting a clock to run continuously or convincing it to give up the energy bound on its alarm spring often required a specific apparatus. As a result, the weight of the drawn lines and the size of the paper vary considerably. Each drawing is presented in simple box frame and accompanied by a one-page account of the drawing process and Adrian’s suppositions about the clock owner’s circumstances.

The first of the alarm spring drawing was created using an old Italian Veglia alarm clock. When released, the alarm hammer struck the surface of the paper so vigorously that it dragged the movement for 3.5cm. 

“The person to last service the old Italian Veglia alarm clock had written his name and a date on the inside of the clock case, which allowed me to conclude that I had just witnessed and recorded Possibly the Last of Bill Tets, Clock Repairman,” as narrated by Adrian.

© 2009-2011 Adrian Göllner, Possibly the Last of Bill Tets, Clock Repairman

© 2009-2011 Adrian Göllner, Possibly the Last of Bill Tets, Clock Repairman

To facilitate another clock drawing, Adrian partially disassembled the clock and prepared a piece of paper to fit over the face. He then started the clock, fitted the piece of paper and replaced the minute hand of the clock. Glued to the minute hand was a small pencil lead. Powered by the winding motion of an old farmer’s hand some seventy or eighty years ago, the lead was dragged across the surface of the paper for a period of 3.86 hours.

© 2009-2011 Adrian Göllner, 1919 Westclox Big Ben, Style 1A Alarm Clock

© 2009-2011 Adrian Göllner, 1919 Westclox Big Ben, Style 1A Alarm Clock

These drawings intrigue me, the straightforwardness of the idea gives me chills, brings me back to old history. The drawings are pure and the energy is strange and yes, Adrian ghostly.


What could I devise to help with the monotonous tasks still ahead? How does an artist rethink the process or think minimalism?

Simplicity is best, but for right now my new project needs its final feature to be complete!

Paper and Folds

The snow is gone and the brown colours are back in Avimor. 

© 2015 Louise Levergneux, Avimor warming up.

© 2015 Louise Levergneux, Avimor warming up.

Time is flying by fast and since the start of January, I am knee deep in Tinkercad, typefaces, colours and design for my next artists' book. I thought it best to take a breath and visit the BAM, no, not the Brooklyn Academy of Music but the Boise Art Museum. 

Incredible how acronyms have become part of our language. When I moved to Boise, the locals asked if I had visited the BAM—what’s a BAM? For newcomers trying to figure out the lay of the land these abbreviations said à la queueleuleu, remind me of a song.

BAM BAM ROM MoMA,

CoCA GAM IMA,

MAMbo MASS MoCA,

MIA MICA MOCA,

SAM YAM OCMA

Everyone has danced à la queueleuleu, if not this video explains the term

Oops, I’m digressing!

Last Saturday, at the BAM, I saw the exhibition: Paper: the Infinite Possibilities of Origami. This exhibition explores the history of folding and origami as fine art. The pieces in the show were created by 45 master folders from around the world and showcased the power and potential of contemporary origami. Paper is endless creativity in these artists’ hands. I met Alexandra Monjar a friendly and dedicated docent able to give us lots of information on the exhibited works.

The koi by MichaeI G Lafosse caught my eye. The koi were delicate yet strong. Back at home I could not wait to explore more origami work on the Internet, I’m intrigued.

My search led me to the Swiss artist, Sipho Mabona. Here is a short documentary of Sipho's work. 

The next video is an introduction to Sipho’s project White Elephant–a life-size 3 metre high origami elephant. 

If you have time the 6 part video on White Elephant is worth it even though it takes nearly an hour to watch—all of them! I'm sure you can speed view at times!

WHITE ELEPHANT Part 1 (8:56 min)

WHITE ELEPHANT Part 2 (13:26 min)

 

WHITE ELEPHANT Part 3 (4 min)

WHITE ELEPHANT Part 4 (13:48 min)

WHITE ELEPHANT Part 5 (10:03 min)

WHITE ELEPHANT Part 6 Final (9 min)

 

These videos brought to mind other artists who create with paper. A good friend, mentor and artist, Francois X. Chamberland, gifted me the bible seen below at the end of the eighties. I still regard it as one of my favourite pieces in our home. I tried my hand at folding and never had the patience to continue.

© 1989 François X. Chamberland

© 1989 François X. Chamberland

Canadian artist Cathryn Miller’s altered books are sometimes filled with Froebel stars–a form of origami that combines folding with weaving. Cathryn’s love for paper can be seen in her altered book Universe / Starry, Starry Night inviting you to play and dream.

© 2008 Cathryn Miller, Universe / Starry, Starry Night

© 2008 Cathryn Miller, Universe / Starry, Starry Night

In Cathryn’s Universe: Foundation Trilogy, a series of altered books made from the pages of Life Nature Library volume "The Universe" pays homage to Asimov's iconic science fiction trilogy. The patience to fold several hundred stars for a project is amazing!

© 2012 Cathryn Miller, Universe: Foundation Trilogy

© 2012 Cathryn Miller, Universe: Foundation Trilogy

The Froebel stars make another appearance in Universe / A Hitchhiker's Guide.

© 2008 Cathryn Miller, Universe / A Hitchhiker's Guide

© 2008 Cathryn Miller, Universe / A Hitchhiker's Guide

You can help Cathryn’s The Wishing Star Project by leaving a wish.

While you are busy wishing, I’m going back to my thoughts and 3D printing ! !

One Less Camera and 3D Printing

A new week, a new dilemma. This world of technology makes our lives more efficient, they say! I use different technologies to create my artists’ books and at the moment I am trying to survive without one of these.

My camera didn’t make it!! After 4 years I felt comfortable with my Sony D-SLR a33. How to replace a beloved camera? 

I am sure someone can figure out what is wrong and repair said camera.

Oh No! No Sony repair shops in Idaho. There are repair shops in New York City, but not in Idaho!! There’s Sony but financially unapproachable. There’s always new cameras...

... But mine had tilting LCD screen, panorama setting, telephoto lens... can I get these capabilities in one camera again?

After a few moments of grief I searched the internet and the thought of having fun with the latest gadgets, got me excited–I grinned to myself. Then the prices flashed on my computer screen! 

Are these amounts for real? Yes! And on sale!

Prices have skyrocketed in the last 4 years. D-SLR’s can do everything under the blue sky, even take photos. As an artist with no real income to speak of, a camera above $500 is overwhelming, but often match the capabilities I would enjoy. What route to take? What confusion! There are hundreds of models from different brands out there for beginners, intermediate and expert photographers. Will let the last choice go! With a particular budget and certain needs, (not wants, needs), the twine shall never meet.

Why can’t artists have access to free tryouts like photographers or other people in the know. WE ARE IN THE KNOW; and it would be fantastic to try out new equipment. If any of you have an idea on how to achieve free try-outs, please share. Any comments on a brand of camera you love would also be appreciated and make my decision easier or not!

Here I am, no camera in hand and a new published book to document entitled “Conversation” for an up-coming exhibition. Argggh!

I am glad I took lots of photos at the end of December. Here's another snowy shot in Avimor, our little community wild and free.

© 2015 Louise Levergneux, December in Avimor, Idaho

© 2015 Louise Levergneux, December in Avimor, Idaho


3D printing as been an interest of mine for several years now. The little robot in this video is Spazzi™ imitating me in a confused frenzy over my camera situation. Spazzi™ has plastic parts that were printed on a MakerBot. Check him out at: http://beatbots.net/80750/713698/projects/spazzi

Last year, I designed a flip book on the theme of EXTRACTION to enhance the idea I felt that both binding and slipcase should be translucent. Since I couldn’t find any translucent board or binding cloth, I designed it for 3D printing. The cost was too high to complete the project. How can one sell a flip book for over $700?

On the up-side, after our move I found an organization with 3D printers. My new book entitled “Finding Home” includes a 3D part. Now, I am able to design and create my idea as I saw it in my minds eye. Hurray!

How? you say, Idaho does not have any connection to Sony but has unBound—a place to make, learn and design your creative ideas! This is the key phrase on their introductory webpage. unBound offers help and access to 3D printing, a design lab, a print center, a sound studio and a business nook. With the moneys I will spend on a D-SLR, having access to unBound is a Godsend. Anyone in the area of Boise or Meridian should investigate unBound.

3D printing has been around for years and it has infiltrated the art world. A slipcase for the limited edition of Chang-rae Lee's novel On Such a Full Sea was printed on a MakerBot Replicator 2 Desktop 3D Printer. You can listen to Helen Yentus, the art director of Riverhead Books, talking on designing the 3D printed slipcase.


Tom Burtonwood an artist and educator based in the Chicago area, creates artists’ books using a 3D printer. You can find more information on Tom's books on his site. Orihon is the first entirely 3D printed book of textures and reliefs of architectural patterning and decoration.

© 2014, Tom Burtonwood,  " Orihon "

© 2014, Tom Burtonwood,  "Orihon"

Tom Burtonwood and Tim Samuelson in a humorous way talking on their collaboration of Twenty Something Sullivan at Pecha Kucha at Chicago Architecture Biennial in October 2015.

© 2015, Tom Burtonwood and Tim Samuelson, detail of "Twenty Something Sullivan"

© 2015, Tom Burtonwood and Tim Samuelson, detail of "Twenty Something Sullivan"

© 2014, Tom Burtonwood, "F olium"

© 2014, Tom Burtonwood, "Folium"

© 2014, Tom Burtonwood, "F olium"

© 2014, Tom Burtonwood, "Folium"


Bill Westheimer uses the phrase book sculptures to describe his work. Bill’s book entitled Silver Sunbeam incorporates some 19th century style wet-plate photograms on the cover of the box and the book. The contents of the book is a USB flash drive with a scan of the original 1864 Silver Sunbeam book which taught the world how to make wet-plate photographs. Check it out! It is worth the time to browse Bill’s awesome work. Here are some tantalizing photos of Silver Sunbeam.

© 2015, Bill Westheimer, Silver Sunbeam

© 2015, Bill Westheimer, Silver Sunbeam

© 2015, Bill Westheimer, Silver Sunbeam

© 2015, Bill Westheimer, Silver Sunbeam

© 2015, Bill Westheimer, Silver Sunbeam

© 2015, Bill Westheimer, Silver Sunbeam

Fantastic work guys!

unBound, a subsidiary of the Meridian Library was a great find, I’m stoked! Need to get back to my ideas and learn Tinkercad.